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When creating collections of objects or values in Swift, we usually use data structures provided by the standard library - such as Array, Dictionary and Set. While those three cover most use cases, sometimes creating a custom wrapper collection can enable us to make our code more predictable and less prone to errors.

The Codable protocols are one of the coolest recent additions to Swift. Even though it works similarly to its community counterparts like Unbox, Codable has the advantage of being powered by the compiler. One of my favorite features in Unbox was to give a context to the decoding operation. Let's take a look at how we can achieve the same with Codable and how I use to power a type-erased Decodable type.

Deploying docker container as part of your continuous integration can cause your disk to fill up pretty quick. Docker does reuse the layers that did not change between deployments. But still, that last layer with you .war or .js bundle can take a few hundred megabytes. Taking into account, that you should be deploying a new version of every update of the master branch, this can take up a gigabyte every day.

Last year, when Swift Package Manager added support for Xcode and iOS projects was announced, I was overjoyed. A short time later, I realized that package resources weren’t supported and many of my hope and dreams for using it were immediately dashed.

With the release of SwiftUI, some people have asked if UIKit is going to be dead. It’s far from dead. In iOS 15, Apple’s engineers continues to pour new features into UIKit. One of the highlights is UISheetPresentationController. This new class lets you easily create a expandable bottom sheet with just a few lines of code. If you have no ideas about what a bottom sheet is, open the built-in Maps app to take a look. It displays a bottom sheet for users to perform search and access their saved locations. The sheet is resizable. You can drag the bottom […]